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  • 40627 Düsseldorf-Unterbach
    Kirche St. Mariä Himmelfahrt

    temperature:
    18,8
    °C
    humidity:
    71,7
    %rF
    measured:
    20:28
    h
  • 31134 Hildesheim
    Michaeliskirche

    temperature:
    17,9
    °C
    humidity:
    69,8
    %rF
    measured:
    20:25
    h
  • 40668 Meerbusch-Lank
    Kirche St. Stephanus

    temperature:
    17,8
    °C
    humidity:
    68,4
    %rF
    measured:
    20:24
    h
  • 52062 Aachen
    DOM

    temperature:
    20,2
    °C
    humidity:
    72,1
    %rF
    measured:
    20:27
    h
  • 50676 Köln
    Krypta Maria im Kapitol

    temperature:
    18,3
    °C
    humidity:
    79,0
    %rF
    measured:
    20:26
    h
  • 66346 Püttlingen-Köllerbach
    ev. Martinskirche

    temperature:
    17,0
    °C
    humidity:
    73,3
    %rF
    measured:
    20:25
    h
  • Church of St.-Hubertus in Grosselfingen
    MAHRCALOR® church heating built in 2010
  • MAHR archives
    Data and ground plans of thousands of churches kept in our archives
  • Petri church in Lübeck
    MAHR-Actherm® control system for 22.000 m³ of church space
  • Sankt Johann in Denkingen
    MAHR church heating 1978 – long life through quality and regular servicing
  • Cathedral and Church of Our Lady in Trier
    MAHR heating systems in UNESCO world heritage sites
  • Church in winter
    A basic minimum temperature saves the substance of the building

Gas Radiator

Structure:

Inside a casing a ceramic body is heated to approx. 900°C by means of an open gas flame, giving off heat mainly by radiation. There is also the possibility of a dark radiator with a lower surface temperature (ca. 650°C). Fumes are led off directly or indirectly, depending on the system. The radiators are usually arranged along the walls or ceiling or, resembling a chandelier, under the crown of an arch, at some distance from the floor.

Advantages of this system:

  • The visitor has an increased sensation of warmth due to the radiation.
  • Rapid effect
  • The system has proven itself in other fields of application (train station platforms, winter gardens, outdoor workplaces etc).

 

Disadvantages of this system:

  • There is often a visual impact due to the necessary gas installations (each radiator must be connected to a gas supply).
  • When in operation, the radiators can, just as with a gas stove, produce audible sounds. Also the ceramic body can make crackling noises as it gets larger under heat.
  • Regulations require that – in order to lead off exhaust – 10m³ must be removed per hour and KW heating power. In a church with a heating power of 100 kw that is 1.000 m³ of exhaust air to be led off. This amount of air can be part of the natural air exchange. If this natural exchange of air is not ensured, ventilators must be installed above the radiators.
  • This air exchange required may well increase the normal exchange of air, with cold air streaming into the church from the outside – cold air that needs to be heated up additionally.
  • There is the possibility of exhaust systems (separate or centrally). However, you should get information about the visual and acoustic impact of those systems.
  • The parts of the body don´t receive the radiation equally. Areas that remain outside radiation, may still feel quite cold.